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20130103
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CSPAN 36
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English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:30pm EST
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> a discussion on climate science and politics. paul by director of nasa's goddard institute of space studies. another look at religion and politics. tomorrow, we are joined by the indiana rep. he will talk about the 113th congress in his priorities. join us sunday at 10:00 eastern and again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video about your message to the president. is your chance to win $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next a discussion on climate science, politics, and global warming. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here. welcome. seven years ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 201
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:05pm EST
continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment.
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:40am EST
i don't think that you actually talk climate science 26 hours a day. but could you tell us a little bit of your conversations with sophie? thank you. >> yeah. so i don't think that it's appropriate to frighten children. [laughter]. and i -- so the only thing that -- until -- now, sophie is -- i have five grandchildren, sophie is the oldest, and finally, i am starting to explain the problem and the fact that there are solutions. but, other than that, i just -- the only thing that i've really done with grandchildren related to this is to try to help them understand nature. so for -- in particular, as i mentioned in my book, we have addressed the monarch butterfly problem. you know, a monarch butterfly as we've noticed on our farm, they are many fewer than they used to be, and that's mainly because not of global warming, but because of pesticides which have been used to reduce the number of milkweeds. and that -- so, therefore, with my grandchildren, we plant milkweeds. and then they learn about this remarkable life cycle of monarch butterflies which migrate all the way to mexico. well
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:00pm EST
of having to continue the united states preeminence, not just in the space program but in terms of science and everything else that goes along, it ended up being washed away in stimulus funds. as this hearing has highlighted, the approach to this lacks clear mission. he is relying on the success of commercial space. i strongly support a public /private partnership for our space policy. it is up to now said to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector does the not have enough funds to do it by itself. that rocket means a net to overcome the administration's shortsightedness. they supported a mission to the moon. president obama has taken a been there done that approach. we have not been there for 40 years. the partners would have helped us. they have never been there. this will fill the void be left behind. that will have a trickle down of that on the number of people that we train as scientists and engineers to keep america's pre- eminence in practically everything else. would you please discuss the problems caused by the cancellation of the program and what is needed from c
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:35am EST
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:20pm EST
, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. people will be self interested. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 10:30pm EST
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:32pm EST
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am EST
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am EST
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 7:00am EST
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 6:30pm EST
. >> have there been environmental science associated with these data centers? >> absolutely. we have a whole chapter on the case of the amazon in northern virginia. amazon was assessed large fines. it was around $200,000. that is very high in the world. you do not see find that high very often. -- fines that high very often. they were not getting the environmental permits for those generators. they were running them and causing emissions without getting the proper permits. they tell me they have now obtained those permits in northern virginia. that is what amazon told me when i contacted them for this story. >> james glanz, the quincy experience, how is it that quincy has become a growth area for these data centers? >> that's right. half a dozen. yahoo is right there. microsoft is the biggest. these data centers tend to cluster. part of the reason is that if energy prices are low, you'll get a lot of these data centers coming in. but you have other factors that come into play. one is connectivity to the fiber-optic. there is a lot of fiber optic in quincy. other things like tax break
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 1:00am EST
. >> in the summer of 1991, they had breakfast with the washington correspondent for " the christian science monitor," and he has this regular meeting with politically important people with a bunch of reporters present, and they raise the issues of the rumors, and hillary clinton says, "i want you all to know that we have had lot -- trouble in our lives as a married couple, but we love each other. we believe in each other. i love my husband, and we are going to stay together for the rest of our lives," and they are blown away by her commitment. what they do not know is that this is a dress rehearsal, because nine months later, when bill is soaring in the polls, almost on top of the new hampshire primary, a senator from massachusetts, the next door state, at that moment, jennifer flowers says that she has said a 12-year love affair with bill clinton and has the tape recordings to prove it. >> and professor on how the clintons had their relationship benefit their political ambitions. this is continuing four days of nonfiction books and authors through new year's day on c- span's booktv. >> neil armstr
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:35am EST
it well and a grown man can never master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" if any of us had a moment where arnold pa
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 5:00pm EST
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 10:00am EST
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 9:00am EST
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:00pm EST
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 2:00am EST
in debates in school and college, they are often rather more about style than sub science. sometimes they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for improving
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
. that is in the art, science times, style -- it means basically telling you how to live. when it becomes cultural criticism, it is telling you what opera to go to or whether "the nutcracker" is good. it turns out we know from surveys that people read a great deal more about health than they used to. people are reading the newspaper to find out how to take care when your elderly parents -- what happens when your foot falls asleep, if you go to a place 15,000 feet high you should take pills because somebody might drop dead, which happens to one of my colleagues. people are reading more for that. that is what they call value added journalism -- i call it how to live journalism. one thing about these extra sesections -- to sell something other than the record. -- the "times" used to have one page a week. one page a week. now think about the "times" and what it is -- it is highly different. the other thing they're doing better -- cultural criticism. i talked about with one member of the audience -- cultural criticism used to be really what might be called culture in new york. now it is every kind of c
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:30pm EST
can't do it. but it's going to take a bipartisan approach. i mean, it's not rocket science to see that we have a democratic senate, a republican house, and a democratic president and that's going to be the same starting january 3 of next year for at least two more years. so we know what we're dealing with and i think it affects us right now in the fiscal cliff negotiations because we're not going to do anything unless it is bipartisan. we will not be able to pass anything in the house that doesn't have significant republican votes in the senate and the democrats in the senate are not going to be able to support something that won't require some votes of democrats in the house. so we are together. maybe it's like a dysfunction alal family but we do have to work together because without bipartisanship, nothing is going anywhere. therefore, i think you have to go back to negotiations 101, which is that someone in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the other party in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the president is not going to get everything he wants. the repub
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all the trees are worth as much is something those of us -- all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low- income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the cou
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 7:00am EST
rocket science. stop spending money we don't have. cut back on what we do spend and stop sending money to our enemies. now, there's a novel idea. paul from beaumont, said this. we don't have a revenue problem. instead, it's been a spending problem and it's been a spending problem for a long time. larry said, if i'm ute of cash i stop -- if i'm out of cash, i stop spending. perhaps congress should do the same what i do in my house. when i don't have enough money i stop spending. congress has a printing press backed by the chinese. ashley says, spending must be stopped. just taking more from americans is not good. if my taxes aren't affected, my employers are. what will happen to me in the long run? i guess i'm going to find out. yes, you are going to find out here on new year's eve. i am fed up on not agreeing to a budget and this out-of-control action has got to stop. renee from crosby, texas, said this. please demand that spending be cut, fraud, waste and abuse be stopped in government spending and address this before anybody thinks about raising taxes on hardworking americans. mr. sp
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 7:00am EST
science monitor." he has this regular meeting with politically important people. they raise the issue of the rumors of bills -- bill's philandering. hillary said, i wanted to know that we have had troubles in our married lives, but we love each other, we believe in each other, and i love my husband, and we will stick together for the rest of our lives. there were blown away. what they do not know, and what neither of the clintons know, is that nine months later when a bill is soaring in the polls, at that very moment, flowers says she has had a 12-year love affair with bill clinton. >> bill chase and how the clinton's relationship benefit in the political ambitions. that is tonight at 10:00 eastern. that continues squadder days of nonfiction authors on booktv. -- four days of nonfiction authors on booktv. "washington journal" continues. host: we're back with george zornick. what you think of this deal was reached in the senate last night? caller: is a crazy time we live in. what happened last night is absent of meaning without the or thent's signature house. you had the sequester go i
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 10:00am EST
the aging population. also in terms of quality. they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading and rank countries every three years. and then productivity. productivity is supposed to account for about 60% of white one country grows and another does not. how efficient we are in using capital labor and rule of law, how open the business environment is. we know what is happening there. look at the frame work and applied it to the emerging markets. i am incredibly bullish for 2013 and the years ahead. places like africa -- compared to over 100% in places like greece and italy. these countries are not suffering from the leveraging problem. 60% of the emerging world is under the age of 25. over the to% in places like uganda. there are issues with youth employment. we are talking about 30% increases. opportunity for economic growth. things like political improvement in terms of democracy and freedoms. i have to have this debate with you, bill. countries like rwanda have been ranked number 1 by the world bank as the most improved. then the closed by telling you this. 90%
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm EST
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)